Building a DIY sub-500 gram quadcopter

In a previous post I’ve discussed the advantages of a lightweight aircraft: longer flight times, quieter operation, less stress to the components, more responsive control. In addition, having an aircraft below 500 grams (less than around 1.10 pounds) has the advantage that in many countries it does not require registration to fly, except for where

Another take on the CF frame

In the last post I went through the process of designing and realizing my first Carbon Fiber-based H-quad. While the molding and lamination process itself was successful, the design was based on an open section, a fact that made it twist excessively even though it was quite resistant to bending. I thus went on to

On the Road to a Full-CF Aircraft

The main driving force behind my current UAV experiments is lowering aircraft weight and noise. In principle though, this should not come at the expense of other factors, such as flying time, rigidity, responsiveness and crash-worthiness. So with these in mind, and after the eventual success of my last build, I’ve been planning for some

Flash & Burn, ESC edition

Many ESCs produce a high-pitched whining noise while running the motors. This is a result of the current switching that happens at the ESC. In many models, the frequency of switching is in the high audible range, and this translates to whining noise. If you’ve been following this blog for some time, you;d know that one of

S01E01: The W-500

It always starts with an F-450, or a clone of it. Always. Unless you’re a pro willing to cough up a five digit figure just to get in the air, or you’re going for the RTF stuff, you must have come across an F-450 in your multicopter ventures. I think that DJI should be proud